NASA Kennedy’s Layered Composite Insulation System

NASA Kennedy’s Layered Composite Insulation System

Agency: 
NASA

Laboratory: Kennedy Space Center

Technology: Layered Composite Insulation for Extreme Conditions (LCX)

Opportunity: This technology is available to license by interested parties.

Details: NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a layered composite insulation system for nonvacuum applications and extreme environmental exposure conditions. This layered composite insulation system for extreme conditions (LCX) is particularly suited for complex piping or tank systems that are difficult or practically impossible to insulate by conventional means. Consisting of several functional layers, the aerogel blanket-based system can be tailored to specific thermal and mechanical performance requirements. Mechanically, the LCX system not only withstands impact, vibration, and the stresses of thermal expansion and contraction, but can support pipes and other structures, all while maintaining its thermal insulation effectiveness. NASA KSC is currently seeking companies interested in licensing LCX for commercial applications.

Benefits:

  • Thermal insulating performance on par with the best foam materials in new condition.
  • LCX (six-layer specimen) is estimated to withstand compressive mechanical loadings of more than 180 kPa (26 psi), corresponding to a compression of 75 percent of original thickness, with full elastic recovery.
  • LCX systems do not need to be perfectly sealed to handle rain, moisture accumulation, or condensation.
  • The system can increase reliability and reduce life-cycle costs by mitigating moisture intrusion and preventing resulting corrosion.
  • Reduces the transfer time (from 6 minutes to 2 minutes) of cryogenic liquid when used to wrap a cryogenic transfer hose.
  • Increases the flexibility of cryogenic transfer hose by reducing hose rigidity.

Applications:

  • Insulating pipe couplings, fittings, transitions and valves
  • Could be adapted for any cryogenic tank insulation system requiring operation in the ambient environment and space launch vehicle applications for “external insulation” of cryogenic tanks, particularly LH2 upper stage and structural components (problem spots) connecting to any cryogenic tank
  • Residential and commercial construction
  • Chilled-water piping
  • Piping, tanks, and vessels
  • Cryogenic systems
  • Thermal protection systems
  • Launch vehicles
  • Structural panels.

Contact: For more about this technology and to apply for licensing, contact kurt.r.kessel@nasa.gov.

To view the original NASA technology listing and marketing sheet, go to https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/KSC-TOPS-58.

Region: 
Southeast