Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

FLC Region

Security Lab

No

Address

1600 Clifton Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30329
United States

Laboratory Representative

Description

CDC works 24/7 to protect the health, safety, and security of Americans. CDC fights disease whether it starts at home or abroad, is infectious or not, or occurs naturally, by accident, or from a deliberate attack. CDC promotes the health and well-being of Americans of all ages—doing all it can to prevent infections, injuries, and illnesses from ever occurring.

CDC protects the nation and the world by:

  • Detecting, responding to, and stopping new and emerging health threats.
  • Preventing injuries, illnesses, and premature deaths.
  • Discovering new ways to protect and improve the public's health through science and advanced technology.

With an annual budget of more than $12 billion and more than 13,000 staff, CDC supports communities throughout the U.S. and protects Americans by working in more than 60 countries around the world. Almost 85% of CDC's domestic funding is provided directly to state and local entities to detect and control disease, prevent the leading causes of death, and prepare for health threats.

Mission

CDC works 24/7(https://www.cdc.gov/24-7/index.html) to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.

Tech Areas

Available Technologies
Displaying 1 - 10 of 139
A Novel Thermal Method to Inactivate Rotavirus for Use in Vaccines
Air Quality Assurance: A Monitor for Continuous, Simultaneous Analysis of Atmospheric or Aerosolized Particulate Mixtures
Antigen, Encoding Gene, Related Monoclonal Antibody and Hybridoma Clones for Streptococcus pneumoniae Serological Diagnostics
Antigen-capture Electrochemiluminescent Assay for Determining Rabies Vaccine Potency
Antigen-capture Electrochemiluminescent Assay for Determining Rabies Vaccine Potency
Auscultatory Training System and Telemedicine Tool with Accurate Reproduction of Physiological Sounds
Automated Microscopic Image Acquisition, Compositing and Display Software Developed for Applied Microscopy/Cytology Training and Analysis
Cable-line Safety System: Electro/hydraulic Emergency Stop Device for a Winch, Drum or Capstan
CDC Mosquito Trap for Control and Surveillance of Mosquitoes Including Carriers of Zika & Other Viruses
CDC Trioplex Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Zika, Dengue, & Chikungunya Virus Infections in One Clinical Sample

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Funding

CDC's Office of Financial Resources awards and administers grants and cooperative agreements to state and local governments, foreign ministries and associations, domestic non-profits/educational institutions, and domestic for-profit groups. Individuals are ineligible to apply for and cannot receive funding through CDC grants and/or cooperative agreements.

Grants and cooperative agreements provide the means to transfer money, technical assistance, and expertise to partners in exchange for their contributions to federal public health goals and objectives. " Assistance"s or "financial assistance mechanisms" are terms used to refer to grantsand cooperative agreements collectively, although they have different meanings.

Programs

CDC's Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP) helps states and tribes across the United States increase colorectal (colon) cancer screening rates among men and women aged 50 years and older. An increase in screening rates will reduce illness and death from colorectal cancer.

On September 30, 2015, CDC announced it has awarded a total of $22,800,000 to 24 state health departments, six universities, and one American Indian tribe. Please see the press release.

Work collaboratively with state and community partners to efficiently and effectively implement chronic disease prevention and health promotion strategies.

For more than 20 years, CDC's National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has provided low-income, uninsured, and underserved women access to timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services.

Comprehensive cancer control (CCC) is a collaborative and strategic approach used by communities and their partners to combine, share, and coordinate resources to reduce the burden of cancer. In 1998, CDC established the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) to support this wide-ranging and inclusive effort. The program provides funding and technical support for the development and implementation of CCC plans. These plans guide the work of many and focus on current and emerging cancer issues, including cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, rehabilitation, and survivorship. Today, CDC funds CCC programs in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, seven tribes and tribal organizations, and seven U.S. territories.

Data collected by local cancer registries enable public health professionals to understand and address the cancer burden more effectively. CDC provides support for states and territories to maintain registries that provide high-quality data.

Facilities
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12
Anthropometry Scanning Laboratory
High Bay Laboratory
Human Digital Modeling & Hand Scanning Lab
Human Factors Laboratory
NIOSH Lake Lynn Laboratory
NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory
NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory
NIOSH Spokane Research Laboratory
Protective Systems Laboratory
Safety Engineering Laboratory

Pages

No Equipment for this lab
No publications for this lab
Success Stories

In March 2016, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Evolva Holding SA (also known as “Evolva”) to further study and develop nootkatone. The technologies involved in the described in this successful CRADA are patented compounds, compositions, and methods that employ a naturally derived substance for controlling arthropod (e.g., mosquito, tick, and flea) pest populations. The active ingredient, nootkatone, is found in Alaska yellow cedar trees (also known as the Nootka cypress), some herbs, and citrus fruits. CDC biologists have found nootkatone to be an effective repellent and pesticide for use against ticks and mosquitoes.

Nootkatone is being tested against a variety of pests, notably the ticks that are responsible for spreading Lyme disease bacteria, the mosquitoes contributing to the spread of Zika, chikungunya, and dengue viruses, as well as head lice, bed bugs, and other biting insects. Given the technology’s promise and urgency of the recent Zika outbreak, CDC Technology Transfer Office (TTO) team members worked to expedite the CRADA as many other Zika-related inquiries for different agreements were coming in.

CDC and Evolva entered into the CRADA to expeditiously conduct the safety and efficacy trials required for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registration of the biopesticide nootkatone as a repellent and pesticide against ticks and mosquitoes prior to bringing products to the market. CDC’s partner, Evolva, also has a cost-effective, patented yeast fermentation process for producing high-purity and high-yield nootkatone.

CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) is currently working with Evolva to evaluate formulated test products for the mosquito work. Evolva also has an exclusive Patent License Agreement to utilize CDC’s three related patented nootkatone technologies.

CRADA Outcome

Although currently available tick repellents for use on skin, clothing, or in the yard are considered safe and effective when used as directed, many people are reluctant to use chemicals. To provide other options, CDC scientists discovered that a natural organic compound found in plants can repel or kill biting pests.

CDC and Evolva are performing necessary safety and efficacy studies for EPA-registration of nootkatone. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is co-sponsoring these studies. EPA has classified nootkatone as a biopesticide. Evolva anticipates EPA registration of nootkatone as a manufacturing product in 2018. Evolva is working on regulatory approvals of nootkatone in other parts of the world with a focus on East-Asia and South America.

In 2017, the US Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) and Evolva negotiated an 18- month contract funded by CDC to advance mosquito-focused product formulation development and EPA regulatory registration, and help prepare nootkatone product manufacturing readiness.

Vector-borne diseases remain a global threat. New pathogens are being discovered; known ones are spreading to new areas. Insecticide-resistance to mosquitoes is a growing problem with few options available to us to combat the threat. Given the recent Zika outbreak and devastating effects to newborns, new repellent and pesticide solutions are desperately needed. With the CRADA, exclusive license, and contract in place, patented nootkatone may become a new tool in our arsenal to fight mosquitoes and other biting pests.

CDC appreciates that public health research requires the input and effort of many partners to achieve success.

Note: The initial work took place at CDC’s Fort Collins campus and Evolva Holding’s facilities. The mosquito work is moving forward under the subsequent BARDA contract.