Agency/Department

FLC Region

Security Lab

Yes

Address

Bldg. 460
P.O. Box 5000
Upton, NY 11973-5000
United States

Laboratory Representative

Description

One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers. Established in 1947 on Long Island, Upton, N.Y., Brookhaven is a multi- program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Six Nobel Prizes have been awarded for discoveries made at the Lab. Brookhaven has a staff of approximately 3,000 scientists, engineers, technicians and support staff and over 4,000 guest researchers annually. Brookhaven National Laboratory's role for the DOE is to produce excellent science and advanced technology with the cooperation, support, and appropriate involvement of our scientific and local communities.

Mission

The fundamental elements of the Laboratory's role in support of the four DOE strategic missions are the following:

  • To conceive, design, construct, and operate complex, leading edge, user-oriented facilities in response to the needs of the DOE and the international community of users.
  • To carry out basic and applied research in long-term, high-risk programs at the frontier of science.
  • To develop advanced technologies that address national needs and to transfer them to other organizations and to the commercial sector.
  • To disseminate technical knowledge, to educate new generations of scientists and engineers, to maintain technical capabilities in the nation's workforce, and to encourage scientific awareness in the general public.

Technology Disciplines

Technologies
Displaying 1 - 10 of 146
12-31: Nanowires
3-D TRENCH ELECTRODE DETECTORS
3D-TRENCH ELECTRODE DETECTORS
APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR BIOLOGICAL PURIFICATION OF WASTES
ATMOSPHERIC RADAR
BNL 14-21: X-Ray Crystallography Growth Plates
BSA 00-22: Assaying Clustered DNA Damages
BSA 00-28: Synthesis of YBCO Superconductors Using Low-Pressure Processing
BSA 01-07: Carbon Monoxide Tolerant Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst
BSA 01-10: Halogenated Carboranyl Porphyrins for Imageable Tumor-Targeting Agents for Radiation Therapy

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Facilities
Displaying 1 - 10 of 27
Advanced Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy
Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)
Accelerator Test Facility
Accelerator Test Facility (ATF)
Advanced UV and X-ray Probes
ATLAS
Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research (ARM)
Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer
Center for Functional Nanomaterials
Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

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Equipment

No Equipment

Programs

No Programs

Funds

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend eleven months working in a Federal agency or in a U.S. Congressional office, bringing their extensive knowledge and experience in the classroom to education program and/or education policy efforts.

Current sponsoring agencies include: the Department of Energy (DOE), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The DOE sponsors up to four placements in congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act was signed into law in November 1994 and gives the DOE the responsibility for managing the program (Fellowship Act Public Law 103-382, Improving America's Schools Act of 1994). The DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) manages this program for DOE in collaboration with the Triangle Coalition for STEM Education and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Some outstanding contributions of past Einstein Fellows include:

Designing and implementing national science, math, and technology education programs;
Initiating collaborations and partnerships among Federal agencies;
Drafting legislation and advising on policies that seek to improve K-12 education in the United States;
Creating web-based science education tools; and
Establishing and evaluating national and regional programs centered on school reform and teacher preparation in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology.

The workshops, conducted over the course of two days, consist of introductory lectures on synchrotron science, techniques, and operations. Hands-on experimental activities will be offered to participants using a variety of beamlines. Additionally, there will be a writing tutorial focused on the development of competitive beamline proposals for independent research at the NSLS.

The emphasis of this program is to equip students with the necessary tools that assist in the choice of career options, whether it is entering the workforce as a technician, pursuing an undergraduate degree, or both.

This program places students form community colleges in paid internships in Science, Engineering and Technology at BNL. Because of the comprehensive nature of this program, many of the participants have felt it has had an enormous influence on their careers. Students work with scientists or engineers on projects related to the laboratories' research programs. They also attend career planning and numerous training/informational sessions.

The CCI program at BNL will include features which have been the mainstay of our undergraduate programs since 1952.

• Students participate in a Technical Internship, which allows them to participate in one of BNL's ongoing scientific and technical projects.

• Students will participate in cutting-edge research or technology development, directed by a staff member of the BNL scientific community.

• The nature of the internship assignment will be determined after a review by BNL staff of the applicants' background and interests, relevant to the current scientific and technical activities at BNL.

• Students will have the chance to present their scientific or technical results both verbally and in writing, and may appear as a contributor to a scientific journal article or BNL report.

• Students will also participate in Educational Enhancement Activities, offering not only a specific scientific or technical experience, but an in-depth exposure to the scientific enterprise.

• Students will spend approximately 20% of their time in specific group or individual activities designed to promote career development.

The Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP) intends to pair graduate students with a Brookhaven National Laboratory scientist on a mutually agreed upon project, which will enhance the interns' research skills and may lead to multiple scientific publications and may support their graduate thesis or dissertation. In addition, the GRIP intern will act as a liaison between the university advisor and the BNL scientist in fostering relationships and research opportunities with the two institutions.

After completing all necessary training, students can spend up to three months interning with an assigned BNL researcher and have the option to continue the project during the semesters following, depending upon the requirements by both the researcher and respective college/university. During the semester periods, the candidate will conduct research on scheduled days, which shall notinterrupt their course work at the home institution. The project undertaken may support the student's dissertation or thesis.

Funding:
- Funding for this program will be provided by your home institution.

Program provides:
- Housing, in a single occupancy dorm room
- On-site transportation

Deliverables:
- Research paper, poster for presentation, pre- and post-surveys, and final experience report

The goal of the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program is to prepare graduate students for science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) careers critically important to the DOE Office of Science mission, by providing graduate thesis research opportunities at DOE laboratories. The SCGSR program provides supplemental awards to outstanding U.S. graduate students to pursue part of their graduate thesis research at a DOE laboratory in areas that address scientific challenges central to the Office of Science mission. The research opportunity is expected to advance the graduate students' overall doctoral thesis while providing access to the expertise, resources, and capabilities available at the DOE laboratories.

The SCGSR program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS), in collaboration with the 6 Office of Science research programs and the DOE national laboratories. Online application and awards administration support is provided by Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) under Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

The SCGSR program provides supplemental funds for graduate awardees to conduct part of their thesis research at a host DOE laboratory in collaboration with a DOE laboratory scientist within a defined award period. The award period for the proposed research project at DOE laboratories may range from 3 months to 1 year.

Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Overview

The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas. As part of the program, selected university/college faculty members collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research project of mutual interest. Faculty member participants may invite up to two students (one of which may be a graduate student) to participate in the research project.

The Visiting Faculty Program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) in collaboration with the DOE laboratories.

Applications for the VFP are solicited annually for appointments to the Summer Term (May through August), which is 10 weeks in duration. Each of the 14participating DOE laboratories offer different research opportunities (not all laboratories participate) and interested faculty members are encouraged to contact DOE laboratory scientists in advance to discuss research projects of mutual interest. Student participation is optional.

All VFP faculty applicants must submit at the time of applicationa research project proposal co-developed with the collaborating research staff located at the host DOE laboratory.Proposal guidance and requirements can be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/how-to-apply/developing-a-research-proposal/.

Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Overview

The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas. As part of the program, selected university/college faculty members collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research project of mutual interest. Faculty member participants may invite up to two students (one of which may be a graduate student) to participate in the research project.

The Visiting Faculty Program is sponsored and managed by the DOE Office of Science's Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) in collaboration with the DOE laboratories.

Applications for the VFP are solicited annually for appointments to the Summer Term (May through August), which is 10 weeks in duration. Each of the 14participating DOE laboratories offer different research opportunities (not all laboratories participate) and interested faculty members are encouraged to contact DOE laboratory scientists in advance to discuss research projects of mutual interest. Student participation is optional.

All VFP faculty applicants must submit at the time of applicationa research project proposal co-developed with the collaborating research staff located at the host DOE laboratory.Proposal guidance and requirements can be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/how-to-apply/developing-a-research-proposal/.

The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society sponsors and administers the summer schools in nuclear and radiochemistry which are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Students participating in the six week summer program at Brookhaven National Laboratory will have the opportunity to visit research sites, attend a guest lecture series, and meet and interact with prominent research scientists working in nuclear and radiochemistry.

The summer school program was founded as an educational outreach activity to promote interest in nuclear science and to provide trained personnel to meet national needs in nuclear research, the nuclear power industry, and nuclear medicine.

The course will present students with critical assessments of the current nonproliferation arrangements. With exercises and demonstrations the course will introduce students to the technologies of international nuclear safeguards and detection of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Above all, the course aims to give participants the knowledge, analytic tools and motivation to contribute to improvement of the nonproliferation regime.

Audience for This Program

Graduate students interested in learning about nuclear nonproliferation

Students spend one week at BNL during the winter break and participate in a lab related research project. Students also interact with Laboratory staff members, attend lectures on current research projects and are guided on tours of the Laboratory facilities to witness scientific projects in progress. Students are expected to participate in a team research experience and present their results at the closing of the college Mini-Semester.

Program Provides
~ Housing: single-occupancy dormitory rooms
~ On-site transportation
~ All Supplies
~ Program will operate from 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Audience for This Program

Full-time sophomore, junior, and senior college, or university students.

Program Benefits

Many of these students return to BNL as part of the Community College Institute (CCI) or the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI). Both of these programs offer students the opportunity to become part of a scientific research team for a summer. The SULI program also offers internships during the fall and spring semesters. Students who participate in the College Mini-Semester program are encouraged to apply for the 16-week academic semester programs and for the 10-week summer program

Rules & Eligibility Criteria

A focus on selecting a diverse and talented pool of student interns is given. All students in good standing that meet the eligibility criteria are invited to apply.

  • must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien
  • must have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0
  • must provide proof of health insurance

Application Process

A completed application consists of:

  1. An application, completed by the student online
  2. A copy of the student's unofficial transcript, then returned to the school's representative
  3. One recommendation from faculty done online
  4. An essay NOT GREATER THAN 400 WORDS explaining why you want to be part of this program and list three areas of research interests including the relevant BNL scientist names performing the research.
  5. BNL Insurance Information, Photo Permission and PRA Form.

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Publications

No Publications

Successes

Sulfur concrete was developed more than thirty years ago by the United States Bureau of Mines. Sulfur concrete is made by mixing sulfur, an inexpensive waste by-product of the petrochemical industry with dicyclopentadiene (DCPD), a fairly expensive organic modifier, with limited availability. This has kept the cost of sulfur concrete high and therefore, sulfur concrete has not been widely used. Dr. Paul Kalb of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) together with partners from Kazakhstan, have devised an alternative concrete composition and method for making it through a process known as Stabilized Sulfur Binder using Activated Fillers (SSBAF).

The SSBAF method uses an organic component waste by-product from the petrochemical industry, mixed with and coated on filler, such as sand, before being energetically mixed with sulfur. Dr. Kalb explained that this “green” process recycles industrial byproducts and, unlike the process for making conventional concrete, does not produce carbon dioxide. This improved sulfur concrete is less expensive than conventional SPCs, requires no water, and is highly resistant to corrosive environments. This sulfur concrete can be used in a number of applications including precast concrete products such as pipes, tanks, containers, blocks and slabs.

In 2012, Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC. (“BSA”), contractor/operator of BNL entered into an Option Agreement with Green Sulfcrete, a Long Island NY based company that was formed to commercialize the BNL’s sulfur concrete technology. Green Sulfcrete was granted an option under the DOE Startup America program. The option was granted for the company to make, use and sell sulfur concrete made by the BNL process in certain territories. Recently the company changed its name from Green Sulfcrete to Sulfcrete and has entered into a license agreement with BSA. The company was awarded the Phase I SBIR NSF grant. Under sponsored research agreements, the company continues to collaborate with BNL to develop the product further. The company anticipates entering the market with a product in 2016. The website of the company can be found at: http://www.synchropet.com/Home.aspx.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory executed a pre-commercial license with N.E. Chemcat Corporation, Japan’s leading catalyst and precious metal compound manufacturer, for electrocatalysts that can reduce the use of costly platinum and increase the effectiveness of fuel cells for use in electric vehicles. The license also includes access to innovative methods for making the catalysts and an apparatus used to manufacture them. The pre-commercial license allowed market and technical development to proceed in parallel.

Platinum is the most efficient electrocatalyst for fuel cell reactions, but platinum-based catalysts are expensive, unstable, and short-lived. The newly licensed electrocatalysts have high activity, stability, and durability, while containing only about one-tenth the platinum of conventional catalysts used in fuel cells, reducing overall costs.

The electrocatalysts consist of a palladium or a palladium alloy nanoparticle core covered with a monolayer— one-atom thick—platinum shell. This palladium-platinum combination notably improves the rate of oxygen reduction at the cathode of a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell. This type of fuel cell produces electricity using hydrogen as fuel, and forms water as the only byproduct.

Radoslav Adzic, the Brookhaven senior chemist who led the team that developed the catalysts, said, “We are delighted that N.E. Chemcat Corporation has licensed our platinum monolayer electrocatalyst technology. We hope that it will facilitate the development of affordable and reliable fuel cell electric vehicles, which would be very beneficial for the environment since they produce no harmful emissions. Also, the use of nonrenewable fossil fuels for transportation that contribute to global warming would be greatly reduced, prolonging their availability for other uses in the future.”

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and its Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy funded research that contributed to these technologies. In addition to Adzic, those who contributed to the research include Brookhaven chemists Jia Wang, Kotaro Sasaki, and Miomir Vukmirovic, and postdoctoral fellows Junliang Zhang and Yibo Mo.

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging tool used predominantly in clinical oncology for staging various cancers, assessing treatment strategies, and monitoring the effects of therapies. Emerging new diagnostic radiopharmaceutical agents that have applications in cardiology and neurology will further expand the use of PET.

A team of scientists from the medical, instrumentation and physics departments at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have developed a compact modular PET detector. The technology is covered by four United States patents. The initial invention, named RatCAP (Rat Conscious Animal PET), allows the simultaneous study of neurochemistry and conscious movement. This high-tech, wearable PET scanner that monitor brain chemistry enables correlation of the brain’s chemical information with the awake animal’s activity. David Schlyer, one of the scientists who led the project said “The measurement of chemical messengers in the brain is important to understanding many different diseases and conditions such as drug addiction and movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease.”

The team has applied the same compact modular PET technology to produce PET scanners for various important preclinical and clinical imaging applications. The preclinical applications include PET insert for small animal research magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that allows dual PET –MRI imaging. The clinical applications include the compact wrist PET scanner, a non-invasive tool to determine the arterial input function required in bringing quantitative PET to the bedside and the breast PET insert for breast MRI systems that facilitate functional evaluation of detected lesions to reduce the unnecessary biopsies of false positives.

SynchroPET, a Long Island, NY based startup company, entered into an option agreement with Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) the contractor/operator of BNL to commercialize the technology. SynchroPET was the first BNL start- up that was formed under the DOE Startup America program. Recently, BSA has entered into a commercial license agreement with SynchroPET. The company anticipates entering the market with a product in 2016. SynchroPET’s website can be found at: http://www.synchropet.com.

The initial RatCAP technology was developed with funding from the DOE Office of Science

BNL PET

Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long history of working with radioisotopes for medical applications. One radionuclide in particular, Tin-117m (117mSn), has unique properties permitting its dual use for imaging and for treatment of various medical conditions. Its first application was as a palliative treatment of bone pain resulting from cancer metastases. For various reasons, this application did not come to fruition as an available treatment. However, this did not deter Dr. Suresh Srivastava’s interests in continuing to develop the use of the material. Nor did it dissuade Dr. Gilbert Gonzales of Clear Vascular, Inc. from continuing his interactions with Brookhaven. The collaboration between Dr. Srivastava and Dr. Gonzales, which began over a decade ago, has now become a business arrangement in which Clear Vascular, Inc. and Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC. (“BSA”), contractor/operator of Brookhaven National Laboratory, have entered into an Exclusive Field of Use License Agreement for Cardiovascular uses of tin-117m.

The license agreement results from a fruitful interaction between Clear Vascular and Brookhaven National Laboratory under the Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (“IPP”) CRADA program. In 2003 Clear Vascular and BSA executed the IPP CRADA that enabled the team to work in Russia to transfer the production technology for tin-117m from a nuclear reactor method to linear accelerator methods. The new methods create greater quantities and higher specific activity tin-117m than was previously practical. The work resulted in four patents for the production of high specific activity tin-117m using a linear accelerator rather than a nuclear reactor. The increased availability of the tin radionuclide is sufficient to support the production of medically useful materials for treatments of cardiovascular conditions.

Clear Vascular has completed phase two clinical imaging trials and will be starting studies on therapeutic treatment s of heart disease.

Licenses

No Licenses